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CETI Award Recipients

2012

Teslan® NanoCoatings, Inc. and U. S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center – Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (ERDC-CERL)
Teslan® Carbon NanoCoating

Teslan® Carbon Nanocoating is one of the toughest, most resilient, and most effective corrosion-resistant coating systems ever made. The special nature of fullerene carbon nanotubes endows them with exceptional strength, toughness, and electrical and thermal conductivity. Teslan® Carbon NanoCoating forms a high-quality barrier film reinforced by carbon nanotubes. This coating system was applied to a 200,000-gallon fuel tank at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. It advances the level of corrosion protection to new levels of knowledge and performance. Teslan® Carbon NanoCoating is a significant improvement over other coatings because it protects as well in two coats as a traditional three-coat zinc-rich epoxy coating system, is applied as easily as a conventional paint system, can be applied without training or special equipment, contains lower metal content, and is more environmentally friendly than plating operations since its use does not produce hazardous wastewater.

U. S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center – Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (ERDC-CERL)
Fully Integrated Structural Health Monitoring System for Steel Truss Bridges

The Structural Health Monitoring System for Steel Truss Bridges is the first system to successfully provide real-time, integrated detection and monitoring and dynamic assessment of steel truss bridges. Until the U. S. Army’s innovative R&D, modeling and analyzing steel truss bridges was extremely complex. The new system uses a network of smart sensors located at critical nodes. Recently, the system successfully provided real-time data and video that enabled a quick response to a barge crash into a pier on the I-20 Mississippi River Bridge near Vicksburg. The technology kept the bridge safely open, avoiding a $1 million economic impact per day for closure and rerouting traffic. Research data was used to develop overall structural health indices and to help bridge inspectors identify structural problems and develop more consistent bridge ratings.

McCarthy Building Companies and Kaiser Permanente
Oakland Medical Center Replacement Project Phase 2

The Oakland Medical Center Replacement Project, Phase 2, helped to validate the benefits of value-added change orders and as-built information for future renovations. The high level of transparency here was not typical. McCarthy and Kaiser Permanente, however, had access to a higher level of information to better plan work and identify and mitigate risks. With change management, streamlining the overall process required shifting to a shared risk, collaborative work flow. To achieve this, lean construction techniques and a common platform were used that ultimately provided the designer and contractor with data that enabled smooth incorporation of change orders. To ensure no disconnect from the coordinated fabrication model to what was installed, McCarthy led a training program for all sub-trades to a consistent level of using the fabrication models to determine exact layout locations.

2011

Mortenson Construction
Fort Carson Warriors in Transition Barracks

The Warriors in Transition program is designed to provide a healing environment for wounded soldiers returning from combat. There would never be a more important customer. With that in mind, the team for this Fort Carson, Colorado, project struck a motto: "Soldier First." The technology and prefabrication concepts used here had a direct and lasting impact on Mortenson's organizational philosophy with preconstruction services.

The Warriors in Transition program is designed to provide a healing environment for wounded soldiers returning from combat. There would never be a more important customer. With that in mind, the team for this Fort Carson, Colorado, project struck a motto: "Soldier First." The technology and prefabrication concepts used here had a direct and lasting impact on Mortenson's organizational philosophy with preconstruction services. Prefabricated components included:

  • Load bearing precast wall panels, which helped the team avoid field-lay of masonry during the Colorado winter.
  • Preassembled roof truss and deck sections, which reduced schedule and enhanced safety.
  • Modular bathrooms, which reduced construction time and provided superior quality to the 120 living units.

Virtual design and construction included the following models:

  • Each bathroom pod type to "plug-in" to the overall building model.
  • Mechanical and plumbing systems to coordinate with drain and connection locations and hook-up plans for bathrooms.
  • Structural steel and floor joists systems to coordinate with the precast panels and floor drain locations.
  • Precast wall panels for coordination with floor joists, roof joists, mechanical penetrations, and overall architecture.
  • Roof joists to coordinate with the precast wall panels, ductwork systems, and roof sections.

Prefab subcontractors were brought onto the team pre-bid to coordinate each component's BIM. The design phase was completed in less than five months, which allowed construction to start in August and avoid exterior work in the Colorado winter. The overall project, including design and construction, was completed two and a half months early, allowing soldiers to move in sooner than expected. Soldier First: a true success.

2008

U. S. Army ERDC, ElectroTechCP, and the Structural Group: Electro-Osmotic Pulse Control of Moisture in Below-Grade Concrete Structures

EOP technology combines the novel application of an asymmetric, dual-polarity pulse and innovative ceramic-coated electrode materials. The basic research for optimizing the EOP process has led to significant advances in the field of electro-kinetics for systems containing multiple material interfaces. An ability to control seepage-related humidity permits mitigation of occupant health risks from mold, mildew, and bacteria, with associated health and lost work-time costs. A recent cost analysis for rehabilitating two identical basements at Fort Bragg, NC, using EOP and conventional methods, showed the cost of EOP to be $133/linear foot and the cost of conventional water intrusion rehabilitation to be $262/linear foot.

2007

Zachry Construction: Zachry Construction Employment and Conference Center

Zachry Construction Corporation built a new conference and employment center using the U. S. Green Building Council (USBGC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) Program with the goal of becoming a community and national leader in LEED® construction. The center is the first in San Antonio, Texas, to obtain one of the highest certifications from the USBGC: a Gold rating, and is only the fifth Gold-certified LEED® building in Texas.

Vincent Hock

Vincent Hock was project manager for an inventive and innovative R&D project related to the fundamental properties of electro-osmosis in concrete in contact with soil and water interfaces. Ultimately this research led to development of a technology to control the movement of water through low-permeability porous media. This team is credited with advances in electro-osmotic pulse (EOP) and ceramic-coated anode technologies, used together in a novel process to prevent moisture seepage into enclosed spaces.